Category Archives: Art

Customer Appreciation Photo – George – yes, he’s a pretty fish

George the fish - drawing by artist jessica doyle - bathroom decor, wall decor

A few days ago Sue from Michigan emailed this lovely photo of George matted, framed and hanging on this bathroom wall.

Initially Sue emailed asking if I could print George at a larger than 8.5 x 11 inch size so that it would cover 12 x 16 inch wall area. I wrote back saying, that while yes, I can print it out at that size, just to keep in mind that once matted and framed a letter sized print would be around the size she had wanted.

She went ahead purchased the letter sized George about a month ago.

Sue emails…

Jessica – I have attached my framed print of “George” and he looks wonderful in my remodeled bathroom… Thank you so much for brightening my day – every day – when I look at him. I have received so many compliments on the picture. They all love it.

And continues on after I wrote asking for permission to share the photo with you all here on the blog,

You sure can share it with everyone. You should be so proud of him because every time I look at him, I smile, and that’s so important these days. Being in my bathroom he gets frequented often and it’s so much fun to just look at him and smile.

Have a great weekend and thanks again for your wonderful talent!

Sue

Thank you Sue!

George, the pretty fish is available in three sizes…

  1. Limited Edition ACEO Sized George
  2. 5×7 Inch George
  3. Letter Sized George

The Original illustration of George was purchased by a local Canadian Art Collector 18 months ago.

Owl Tattoo

cute owl tattoo - owl illustration design by artist jessica doyle

A few months ago, Kayleigh wrote asking for permission to use my artwork as a tattoo. She wanted to use the opening owl from this blog post as the basis for her tattoo.

The final tattoo turned out pretty fabulous don’t you think! I’m truly honoured that someone liked my artwork enough to have it tattooed on their skin.

Thanks for sending in the picture Kayleigh.

Interested in getting a tattoo of my artwork… simply download it from HandmadeCloud.

Delilah the Fish – Meet the newest member of the Fish family

fish art by Jessica Doyle

Meet “Delilah the Fish” who is the newest member of the growing fish family.

She measures 8.5 x 11 inches (21,5cm by 27,7cm) and was created with the finest artist quality inks and coloured pencils on archival card stock.

Fish look wonderful hanging in bathrooms or in children’s bedrooms. They add a special bit a sea life to any home.

The original is listed here and limited edition prints are listed here. Do note that I am only producing 25 limited edition prints of Delilah.

And you can download a high resolution scan of Delilah and print out a whopping 29 by 22 inch version if you like from here!

Whose Art Is It Anyway?

I usually don’t pay attention to any crazy-artist streaks within me, but I suppose from an outward standpoint it’s probably obvious. I have a tendency to swing between extreme emotions about everything I do, spending half the time loving a painting, and the other half hating it. But that’s normal, right? Creating is hard.

I also like to spontaneously change my work after it’s finished. One might say “destroy.” “Ruin.” “Cover up.” I say “improve.”

I have been known to quietly remove an unsold work from public view in order to change it in such a drastic way that it is essentially a brand new painting. First I’ll paint it white. Then I’ll paint it over.

This infuriates my husband. In his mind, the work now belongs to my fans and my audience, even if no one owns the physical painting. In my mind, the painting isn’t finished until it has a home, and as long as it’s hanging on my own wall, we’re calling it a “work in progress.” Continue reading

In Pursuit of Passion

This past weekend I was talking with my dancer friend about a film she’d recently seen (Pina, a tribute to dancer and choreographer Pina Bausch) that she was very enamored with. She said I had to see it, that all artists would benefit from watching it, regardless of what art they created. I wasn’t opposed to the idea. Having read and benefitted from dancer Twyla Tharp’s universal perspective in her book The Creative Habit, I felt like I was down with the dancing crowd. I didn’t feel compelled to run out and see the movie, but sure. Why not.

To make her point, and because she had a captive audience, my friend whipped out her laptop to show me a few YouTube clips of the film. Okay, yes, it was pretty, and they definitely knew how to dance, and fine, they–OMG WHAT WAS THIS?! What were they doing?! The fluid movements and lovely down tempo beats! The sets! The costumes! IT WAS RAINING ON THE STAGE! The color and texture and framing and… holy crap, this was like watching a painting. I saw each scene much like I see the beginnings of ideas when I start a new piece. It was beautiful. I was downright inspired.

I love talking to other passionate artists. I love hearing them blather at length (as I do) about their individual loves and interests in art. I don’t even have to be familiar with their art to know why they do it. It’s a kinship. We speak a dialect of passion. Continue reading

The Shower Scene – A Gallery Story

I want to say upfront that this is just one story from my life, and not a commentary on the gallery system as a whole. My personal experience with “traditional” galleries has ranged from lackluster to unethical (and possibly illegal, but I’ll get to that in a second.) I do not believe they’re all like that. I’m very open-minded about galleries. I’ve simply had great success and enjoyment representing myself, and doing so is not a reaction to anything negative as much as it is a belief in doing something positive.

But anyway.

When I was starting out professionally, I heard from a number of people within the local art scene that I was ready for my own show. So I went out and got one. The gallery I’d found was up and coming, an offshoot of a more successful gallery nearby. The owner (we’ll call him Shawn) was an artist himself, and sold a great deal of work, all at higher end prices, with a pretty significant and growing following in the area. He liked my work, and immediately offered me a show. After securing a date, I heard from fellow artists that although his art “was a bit formulaic,” he seemed to be a fantastic businessman. The openings I attended in the months leading up to my show were lively events.

When I arrived at the gallery the morning of my own show to set up, I could sense a weird and unexpected attitude from Shawn. He was cold and unhelpful. He abruptly announced that I couldn’t use blacklights, a fairly integral part of my art, despite seeming enthusiastic about them a few weeks prior. He further informed me that I wouldn’t have access to half the space I was promised, because another artist was using it. When I firmly explained the necessity of the blacklights, he finally told me I could use a small room through a hall and in the back for this purpose.

I was determined to keep a good attitude about things. Continue reading

Staying in Creative Shape

It’s easy to forget that our creativity needs practice. We often take artistic abilities for granted, because it’s just “been there” since we were children. Most of us are artists because it comes naturally. Sure we might have to learn discipline about the business aspects, but the art! Hey, that’s the fun part! That’s eeeeasy.

Until you hit a block. Then you spend each day staring at an empty screen or a blank canvas, cursing at the white space, convinced your career is over. The crying. The despair. Or maybe that’s just me. Continue reading

In Between the Art

L

ast weekend I went to a concert of someone I’ve technically known since I was five, and despite the fact that she’s fairly popular, I was woefully unfamiliar with her music and had never seen her perform (unless you count living room karaoke.) It ended up being pretty incredible to watch, not just because the music was awesome (which it was) but because I was witnessing this person that I’d interacted with in a casual way perform as she does best, in her element, in front of her fans, in the spotlight. She displayed a great command of experience and talent in exactly the moment she needed to.

As artists, we’re familiar with this situation to varying degrees. Any time we’re at our own shows, or even doing something as simple as releasing a painting for public view, we summon all necessary skill and confidence into a fixed period of time in which we allow ourselves to be stars, to lead the room in a chorus of our own making. We understand the necessity of doing so, at least in short bursts, especially when we’re promoting something specific.

But what happens the rest of the time? Why do we tend to put our public selves into stasis when we’re not attached to the art? We still have a duty to be artists, which is doing more than making art. We have a purpose to live artistic lives, with intention and passion. Our lives should be as interesting and inspiring as our art. Being an artist is an action, not a title.
Continue reading