Tag Archives: trust

Happy Belated Blogiversary and the Much Anticipated Newly Written Comment Policy

This blog is just over two years old this month. March 5th marked her two year anniversary.

Happy Birthday!

Whhooooooooooohooooooo and the crowd goes wild!

Here is the link to the first post I published to this blog.

To celebrate I am writing her comment policy.

This is my blog. Respect my home. Be honest. Be genuine and above all stay on topic. Don’t drop un-solicited links in the comments of this blog unless they were indeed asked for within the post or add to the post in a natural progression kind of way.

Talk as much or as little as you want. Talk with the others who leave comments on this blog if you like.

I read all comments on this Blog. I will respond to most of them. There may be times when I don’t because life got in the way, some things are better left unsaid or I’m really pissed at you! haha.

A pic

I reserve the right to delete your comment if it is hateful, demeaning or inhuman and spammy. I will not edit your comment for grammar. Your comment belongs to you except I house it! Don’t be dumb. Use a spell check! Remember that whatever you write here shows up in public Google searches worldwide. Copyright infringement is your responsibility within your own comment. I will not be held accountable for any laws broken or illegal activity that takes place within your comment.

I do however reserve the right to use your comment in any way I want. You chose to leave your words here purposefully. I can use it as fodder. I can use it for inspiration. I can duplicate if for artistic purposes and you will receive credit only when credit is due.

I don’t only approve positive comments. We all get angry.

As I continue editing past posts for grammar and updating broken links that were lost in the move, I’ll also be taking a good look at the comments. I know there are some spammy ones that got through my filters and they will be deleted forever.

I will never share your personal email or IP address with anyone. Unless the police come knocking on my door one stormy night, tie me up, feed me truth serum forcing me to recite all my passwords in rhyme and take my computer or you are spam.

I will never spam you. I will mark you as spam if you continue to break the rules after fair warning has been given. If you are spam you could be shared with the world in a most inhuman way.

That sums it up friends. 99% of you already know and respect the above things. It is an unspoken Blogger code of conduct perhaps one learns after Blogging for a few months.

A good rule of thumb is this, if you wouldn’t say or do it in real life then why the hell would you do so online? Think about that.

This comment policy will be linked to from my about page. The photo was taken by a friend this past NYE.

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About Dry Mounting Dead Baby Feet

I have custom picture framed many things in my life. From sew mounting a 24 by 36 inch Peruvian head dress to planning small multiple opening matted family photographs with frame I take care and pride in the work I do. More than that, people trust me with their precious items.

On occasion a *custom order stands out from the rest.

A woman recently came into the frame shop in search of a solution for framing ink prints of both hands and feet of her dead grand daughter. The black prints were on cotton. There was also an accompanying drop of blood on this white cotton. I suggested heat setting the prints, before she poured the planned thick coat of varnish over top of them in her shadow box collage, to set the ink in case it ran after the application of varnish. She left the store with the tiny 6 by 6 inch cotton and returned the following day with her shadow box. She showed me what she wanted to do. I said dry mounting to foam core would heat set the ink. I measured the inside of the shadow box at 12 by 12 inches. She placed the cotton and the other baby memorabilia where she wanted them, forming her collage and I punched those measurements into the framing computer system.

She paid for the mounting, gathered her shadow box, pictures and dried flowers then left. There was this smell. A smell I was unfamiliar with that came unbidden whenever the cotton was exposed… as though life or death was holding onto and surrounding the frame shop. I sandwiched these little feet, hands and blood into cardboard, numbered the bin and thought how sorry I was for this little still born soul. With the picture of the dead baby ringing clear in my mind from a few moments earlier I worked silently.

A couple of days ago I dry-mounted this order. Upon opening the cardboard the smell loomed. I cut the foamcore to 12 by 12 inches. I turned the dry mount machine on. I carefully placed the little hands, feet and blood stain a half inch from the bottom in the center on top of the foamcore. I tacked it on one corner with the heat gun adhering it to the board, lifted the seven foot long machine cover and placed this tiny order in the center. I closed the lid. I clasped the sides. Set the machine to three minutes and 150˚ Fahrenheit and hit start. I prayed.

It was quiet in the frame shop that Tuesday evening. The calm before the Christmas storm.

Three minutes later… beep. BEEP. BEEP…
I hit stop.
Time stopped.

Another 12 seconds pass as I wait for the machine to decompress. I open the lid and lift the light green protective covers revealing these perfect little black ink prints of both hands and feet with blood stain mounted to foamcore. The smell is gone. The cotton now smooth, flat and heat set. The water in my eyes dry and I breath in life again.

Her memory will forever live on now.

RIP

*The exact details of this custom order have been changed to protect the identity of all those involved save for myself.

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