Tag Archives: working

10 Nifty Employment Facts About Me and about using WaveApps Accounting Software

calculator, ink drawing, fabriano quadrato artist journal

So, I’m still working on paperwork for the 2012 year. Holy Cow.

I began using WaveApps earlier in January as doing “it” by hand was just not cutting it any longer. What a marvelous piece of cloud based accounting software. As long as you understand basic bookkeeping you can use Wave Accounting software. The nice thing about Wave is it’s made in Canada and therefore has everything a Canadian small business or self employed person needs.

Anyhow,

  1. I have been working in some form or other since about the age of 12.
  2. And I’ve been self employed for 95% to 100% of that time.
  3. The longest full-time job that I held lasted for 14 months.
  4. I’ve only had THREE full-time jobs in my life. I quit two and was laid off of the the other.
  5. Since quitting drugs seven years ago then smoking 16 months ago and finally drinking 14 months ago my life, career and creativity have stabilized… if that makes sense?
  6. I’ve held numerous part-time jobs over the years to get me out of the studio so to speak… stock-person, picture framer, sales clerk, children’s art instructor, gallery manager, inventory clerk, bathroom cleaner, newspaper girl, sign painter, room rental landlord etc.
  7. I’m healthier, happier and more driven when fending for myself to earn money.
  8. I’ve never been able to qualify for either life or personal health insurance and that has made me very sad at times but uber-driven to live a healthy lifestyle. And none of the three full-time jobs I had offered group insurance.
  9. I am 39 years old.
  10. Nifty fact… As a full-time self-employed artist living in Canada I can legally claim all clothing purchased that I wear to public art shows on my income tax as an expense against my gross income.

I also read this article on home offices on CBC today and found it rather interesting. All I can say is dot your I’s and cross your T’s.

The drawing above is called PaperWork is for the Birds.

The Highs and Lows (of making art)

Tree shadows on canvas

Sometimes I just want to slap myself.

I have terrible mood swings regarding my art. One minute I think my work looks great and my career is going to be swell and everything is awesome. The next, I downward spiral into despair that nothing looks good, nothing is working, I’m a hack, it’s going to fail, people will laugh and mock and cry.

It’s all part of my process.

Generally at some point during every single painting I’ve ever made, I love it; I think it’s the best work I’ve ever done. At another point, with every single painting I’ve ever made, I hate it. It’s trash. It’s not worthy of continuing. And I do this back and forth throughout the entirety of creating each piece until I’m finally happy and satisfied with it. Continue reading

Don’t Make It Good

Don't Make It Good

I wasn’t always a painter. Sure, I’d dabbled before, but it was never something that had any sort of hold over me. In fact, I found it boring. Then one day, out of the blue, I had this terrible, burning, incredible need to paint. To really paint.

So, I did the only natural thing to do. I found this awesome painter I was acquainted with, who had a long and successful career as an artist, walked straight up to him and said,
“I want to paint.”

He didn’t blink. In fact, he told me exactly what to do.

The most important thing, he said, was not to spend too much money on materials. Specifically, he told me to start out with house paint, preferably the “oops” paint (the cans that had been messed up at the hardware store), because it was cheaper. At first I thought this was in case I decided I didn’t like painting. A good point, to be sure, but in actuality he didn’t want me to feel guilty using up anything I’d bought. Which I would have.

Then he told me what continues to be the best advice I have ever received about art, ever:

“Don’t make it good.” Continue reading